Thomas Hale Collection of Civil War Patriotic Envelopes

Illustration from one of the patriotic envelopes

Paul Nelson of the Postal History Foundation of Tucson, Arizona has contacted me in regard to an extraordinary donation of patriotic envelopes to the Foundation. It has received the Thomas Hale Collection of Civil War Patriotic Envelopes which consists of approximately 2000 different historic and colorful pieces of stationery. According to Paul, all are unused envelopes and most are from the Union states, although there are a few with Confederate designs. He indicates that the  freshness and brightness of this group of patriotic envelopes is unusual. The collection has  been stored for years in a family trunk. Many of the covers are hand colored and all are essentially in mint condition. The covers have been organized in the Foundation’s library based on the categories that were published in The Catalog of Union Civil War Patriotic Covers, by William R. Weiss (1995).

With 2011 being celebrated as the 150th anniversary of the beginning of the Civil War, and with the recent release of a new book, Patriotic Envelopes of the Civil War: The Iconography of Union and Confederate Covers by Steven R. Boyd, the subject matter of the Thomas Hale Collection should be of interest to many historians and philatelists. The Thomas Hale Collection of Civil War Patriotic Envelopes is available for study by appointment. Contact the librarian, Charlotte Cushman, at the Peggy Slusser Memorial Philatelic Library, at the Postal History Foundation, 920 North First Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719. The phone, email addresses, and other information may be found on the Foundation’s website.

Embroidered Christmas postcards

Christmas GreetingsImagine spending an entire day’s wages on a postcard. During WWI, some soldiers did just that.

The Canadian War Museum has a collection of embroidered postcards sent by soldiers during WWI. In a new article, the museum’s Research Centre highlights a few Christmas postcards from its collection.

If you are interested in studying postcards, the following book would be a good starting point. It includes library and archives collections as well as a bibliography of books about postcards:

  • Postcards in the library : invaluable visual resources / Stevens, Norman D. — New York ; London: Haworth Press, c1995. (Book) HE6184 .P839 P857 1995

The APRL has many more books and catalogs to assist the postcard collector.  Go to our Online Catalogue and search for “post cards” in the Subject field and “book” to the Record Type field. You can also add a keyword (for example, a country or topic) to the Any Word field to narrow your search.

New Jersey Postal History

The New Jersey Postal History Society has launched what it is calling the NJPHS Free Library. The “Free Library” consists of 35 years of digitized issues of the New Jersey History Society Journal. All but the last five years of the Journal are available freely to non-members as well as members.  The digitized issues are available in searchable pdf format. The Literature and Publications page on their website includes other useful publications about New Jersey postal history. All of these publications are for sale to non-members. Some of the items are available for free download by members.  The Galleries portion of their website includes a digital gallery of New Jersey Illustrated Letter Sheets and a gallery showing digital images of New Jersey Post Offices. Thanks to the NJPHS for making this excellent website about New Jersey Postal History available to the broader philatelic community.

Rabbis on Stamps

The Jewish World in StampsRecently, a library patron sent me a link to Rabbis on Stamps, a collection of images from the Leiman Library, a private collection of Judaica. This is a great resource for topical collectors from a non-philatelic source.

The Leiman Library’s home page gives an introduction to the Rabbis on Stamps collection.

Library patrons who search the APRL Online Catalog for “Judaica” will now find this online resource listed, in addition to books and journal articles.

The APRL has several books mentioned in the Rabbis on Stamps introduction: Continue reading “Rabbis on Stamps”

Military Postal History

American Library Association postcard expressing Christmas greetings from Siberia during WWI

Veterans Day seems like an appropriate occasion to acknowledge the ongoing contributions to the knowledge of military postal history by the Military Postal History Society. According to the Society’s website, the organization was originally called the War Cover Club and the emphasis was on the postal history of World War I. That emphasis has greatly expanded and now includes any interest in the mail sent to and from soldiers, sailors, and airmen in any military conflict. One of my interests in collecting library related mail which I call postal librariana is the role of the American Library Association during World War I. The publications of the Military Postal History Society and its predecessor the War Cover Club have been very helpful in my research in this area. Currently available publications of the Society are listed on their website. The Society’s website  includes an online index to the Military Postal History Bulletin and its predecessors. Copies of articles in previous Bulletins are available for a price from the Society. The American Philatelic Research Library and other philatelic libraries also have copies of their publications and Bulletins.

Philatelic Exhibiting Resources

The Philatelic ExhibitorOne of my greatest enjoyments as a philatelist is creating exhibits of portions of my collection of postal librariana and displaying them at stamp shows. Philatelic exhibiting can be a scary undertaking and I want to mention some resources that helped me make the transition from scary to enjoyable. I joined the American Association of Philatelic Exhibitors (AAPE) long before I was brave enough to enter my first exhibit in a stamp show. The AAPE’s quarterly journal The Philatelic Exhibitor (TPE) has proved to be an invaluable tool. Not only does it provide many great tips on improving exhibits, it makes you feel part of this specialized philatelic community.  Although you have to be a member of AAPE to get current issues of TPE, the AAPE has very generously digitized all issues of TPE over five years old and placed them on their website. In addition, the tables of contents of the issues for the last five years are provided. The AAPE website includes a wealth of other valuable information for exhibitors. One section includes digital copies of award winning philatelic exhibits.

The American Philatelic Society oversees national level stamp show competitions and its Committee on the Accreditation of National Exhibitions & Judges (CANEJ) has developed very useful information to assist both judges and exhibitors. The most important information provided is in the APS Manual of Philatelic Judging, 6th Edition which is available for download. Although this edition was first published in 2009, it has been revised as of November 3, 2010.

The American Philatelic Research Library encourages exhibitors to place copies of their exhibits at the APRL.  These are in both printed and digital formats and are included in the APRL’s online catalog. The APRL would like to work with the philatelic exhibiting community to make more philatelic exhibits available online.

Digital Exhibit of Arizona Postal History

1938 Cover in the Vail, Arizona Digital Exhibit
1938 Cover in the Vail, Arizona Digital Exhibit

The Slusser Memorial Philatelic Library of the Postal History Foundation in Tucson, Arizona is setting an excellent example for how postal history can be effectively incorporated into the broader history of our communities and our states. The Library is a partner with the Vail Preservation Society in a new online exhibit/collection entitled “Between the Tracks: The Story of the Old Vail Post Office”. This collaborative effort involved merging photographic items in the Vail Preservation Society with postal history items in the collection of the Slusser Library. The exhibit is part of the Arizona Memory Project which already includes three other collections from the Slusser Library. The Slusser Library is also working on collaborative exhibits about the Arizona post offices in Oracle and Jerome. The Vail, Oracle, and Jerome post office exhibits are being funded with a federal Library Services and Technology Act grant through the Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records. The grant is called “Centennial Celebration of Arizona Post Offices” and the goal of this project is to preserve the history of the three post offices in preparation for the state’s Centennial. The postal history artifacts from the Slusser Library which are included in the project are from Slusser’s Arizona Postal Document Collection 1884-1949 which is part of Arizona Archives Online. The efforts of Charlotte Cushman, Slusser Library Librarian/Archivist, and the other folks at the Postal History Foundation to reach out to other cultural institutions to cooperate in promoting local and state history is noteworthy.

From the APRL archives: Clipping files

A researcher scans items from the APRL clipping files
David Eeles scans items from the APRL clipping files

As promised, for American Archives Month, here is a peek inside the APRL archives.

The APRL has a vast collection of clipping files, assembled from donations of material from philatelists.

The collection got its start in the late 1980’s with a donation of some 120 file drawers from the estate of Ernest A. Kehr.

Kehr’s clippings cover the world, but the folders related to his collecting interests (air mail, Switzerland, the Philippines, and Egypt) contain the most material.

Continue reading “From the APRL archives: Clipping files”

Postal History in Georgetown

C&O Canal BoatOn Saturday after the Postal History Symposium, my daughter Helen and I lunched in Georgetown before we toured the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Park. This engineering project began in 1828, where Rock Creek meets the Potomac River, with the goal of creating a link to the Ohio River. Had the canal been finished, it would have created a navigable waterway from Chesapeake Bay to Missoula, Montana. However, by 1850 as railroads began to dominate transportation and communication, the canal had been dug only 184 miles to Cumberland, Maryland where it ends today, far short of the Ohio River. As we rode the replica canal boat, pulled by a pair of mules at 2 miles-per-hour, past the historic factories and mills that now house trendy restaurants and boutiques, I mused about the mail contractors who once traveled the towpath to serve Post Offices along the canal.

Bartleby's BooksAfterwards we stopped at Bartleby’s Books on 29th Street. Although they had only a couple philatelic titles in stock, I did not get the puzzled looks that so often greet requests for our literature. And, when I asked Karen Griffin, one of the owners, for postal history and Post Office documents she graciously searched their pamphlets and ephemera stock. The find of the day was the 1794 edition of the Postal Laws and Regulations containing the Post Office Act of 1794, 14 pages of “Regulations to be Observed by the Deputy Postmasters in the United States,” a table of Post-Roads from Passamaquoddy, Maine to Greensborough, Georgia, and 8 sample post office forms showing their correct use. This store certainly warrants a return visit.

October is Archives Month

October is National Stamp Collecting Month. It is also American Archives Month, and archival institutions around the nation are taking this opportunity to promote their collections. In Wisconsin we’re using the theme Postcard Wisconsin to celebrate Archives Month. Archival records can be valuable resources for the philatelic researcher and we hope to highlight selected archival collections in future posts on this blog. The National Postal Museum Library is home to a number of special archival collections and it is beginning to develop online finding aids for these collections. One of the collections is the archives of the Third Assistant Postmaster General’s Office which contains documents related to the design and production of U.S. regular stamp issues from Scott #1 (1847) to Scott #2532 (1991) as well as ‘back of the book’ issues (airmail, postage dues, postal savings, federal duck stamps, and postal stationery) for roughly the same period. On a personal note, I bring stamps and archives together with my collection of archives and archivists on postage stamps.