New Jersey Postal History

The New Jersey Postal History Society has launched what it is calling the NJPHS Free Library. The “Free Library” consists of 35 years of digitized issues of the New Jersey History Society Journal. All but the last five years of the Journal are available freely to non-members as well as members.  The digitized issues are available in searchable pdf format. The Literature and Publications page on their website includes other useful publications about New Jersey postal history. All of these publications are for sale to non-members. Some of the items are available for free download by members.  The Galleries portion of their website includes a digital gallery of New Jersey Illustrated Letter Sheets and a gallery showing digital images of New Jersey Post Offices. Thanks to the NJPHS for making this excellent website about New Jersey Postal History available to the broader philatelic community.

Military Postal History

American Library Association postcard expressing Christmas greetings from Siberia during WWI

Veterans Day seems like an appropriate occasion to acknowledge the ongoing contributions to the knowledge of military postal history by the Military Postal History Society. According to the Society’s website, the organization was originally called the War Cover Club and the emphasis was on the postal history of World War I. That emphasis has greatly expanded and now includes any interest in the mail sent to and from soldiers, sailors, and airmen in any military conflict. One of my interests in collecting library related mail which I call postal librariana is the role of the American Library Association during World War I. The publications of the Military Postal History Society and its predecessor the War Cover Club have been very helpful in my research in this area. Currently available publications of the Society are listed on their website. The Society’s website  includes an online index to the Military Postal History Bulletin and its predecessors. Copies of articles in previous Bulletins are available for a price from the Society. The American Philatelic Research Library and other philatelic libraries also have copies of their publications and Bulletins.

Philatelic Exhibiting Resources

The Philatelic ExhibitorOne of my greatest enjoyments as a philatelist is creating exhibits of portions of my collection of postal librariana and displaying them at stamp shows. Philatelic exhibiting can be a scary undertaking and I want to mention some resources that helped me make the transition from scary to enjoyable. I joined the American Association of Philatelic Exhibitors (AAPE) long before I was brave enough to enter my first exhibit in a stamp show. The AAPE’s quarterly journal The Philatelic Exhibitor (TPE) has proved to be an invaluable tool. Not only does it provide many great tips on improving exhibits, it makes you feel part of this specialized philatelic community.  Although you have to be a member of AAPE to get current issues of TPE, the AAPE has very generously digitized all issues of TPE over five years old and placed them on their website. In addition, the tables of contents of the issues for the last five years are provided. The AAPE website includes a wealth of other valuable information for exhibitors. One section includes digital copies of award winning philatelic exhibits.

The American Philatelic Society oversees national level stamp show competitions and its Committee on the Accreditation of National Exhibitions & Judges (CANEJ) has developed very useful information to assist both judges and exhibitors. The most important information provided is in the APS Manual of Philatelic Judging, 6th Edition which is available for download. Although this edition was first published in 2009, it has been revised as of November 3, 2010.

The American Philatelic Research Library encourages exhibitors to place copies of their exhibits at the APRL.  These are in both printed and digital formats and are included in the APRL’s online catalog. The APRL would like to work with the philatelic exhibiting community to make more philatelic exhibits available online.

Rocky Mountain Philatelic Library Publishes New Book

Mexico's Denver Printing of 1914The Rocky Mountain Philatelic Library in Denver, Colorado has announced the publication of  Mexico’s Denver Printing of 1914 by Ron Mitchell. The book is about the postage and revenue stamps for Mexico’s Provisional Constitutionalist Government which were printed in Denver. The November-December issue of Scribblings, RMPL’s newsletter, indicates that the book is the result of a specialized study by Mitchell which started in 1974.  According to the announcement, “The book is an excellent resource, not only for the Denver Eagles, but for the philately of the 1914-1916 Mexican Revolution.” It includes censuses for both the revenues used as postage and the Denver Eagles postage stamps.  The book is in full color and includes more than 400 illustrations. Included with the book is a DVD which includes digital images of all the illustrations. The price for the book is $50 postpaid to addresses in the United States. To obtain a copy send a check made out to “RMPL” to RMPL Mexico Book, 2038 Pontiac Way, Denver, CO 80224.  This is the second book published by the RMPL.  In 2008 it published Camp Genter, and it has plans for other publications in the future.

Digital Exhibit of Arizona Postal History

1938 Cover in the Vail, Arizona Digital Exhibit
1938 Cover in the Vail, Arizona Digital Exhibit

The Slusser Memorial Philatelic Library of the Postal History Foundation in Tucson, Arizona is setting an excellent example for how postal history can be effectively incorporated into the broader history of our communities and our states. The Library is a partner with the Vail Preservation Society in a new online exhibit/collection entitled “Between the Tracks: The Story of the Old Vail Post Office”. This collaborative effort involved merging photographic items in the Vail Preservation Society with postal history items in the collection of the Slusser Library. The exhibit is part of the Arizona Memory Project which already includes three other collections from the Slusser Library. The Slusser Library is also working on collaborative exhibits about the Arizona post offices in Oracle and Jerome. The Vail, Oracle, and Jerome post office exhibits are being funded with a federal Library Services and Technology Act grant through the Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records. The grant is called “Centennial Celebration of Arizona Post Offices” and the goal of this project is to preserve the history of the three post offices in preparation for the state’s Centennial. The postal history artifacts from the Slusser Library which are included in the project are from Slusser’s Arizona Postal Document Collection 1884-1949 which is part of Arizona Archives Online. The efforts of Charlotte Cushman, Slusser Library Librarian/Archivist, and the other folks at the Postal History Foundation to reach out to other cultural institutions to cooperate in promoting local and state history is noteworthy.

Postal History Foundation Celebrates 50th Anniversary

Postal History Foundation Building

 

On Saturday, October 23rd the Postal History Foundation in Tucson, Arizona will have an open house as part of the celebration of its 50th anniversary.  The open house will include special exhibits, tours, activities for children, a book sale of philatelic literature, and special cachets. The Postal History Foundation was founded in 1960 by William (Bill) Alexander who moved to Tucson from Pittsburgh, PA where he had been Curator of Postal History and Stamps at the Carnegie Museum. Originally, the Postal History Foundation was called the Western Postal History Museum and was a department in what is now the Arizona Historical Society. The name change to Postal History Foundation occurred in 1990 to reflect a broader mission. That mission is to “is to promote an appreciation of stamp collecting and postal history through the preservation of philatelic collections, literature and documents, and the enhancement of youth education using stamps as teaching tools.”  In October, 1996 a new library building opened with the assistance of a grant of $750,000 from the family of Peggy J. Slusser. The library is named the Peggy J. Slusser Memorial Philatelic Library. The library houses a collection of over 30,000 books, journals, catalogs, photos, maps, and other reference items related to the philatelic history of the United States, especially the Western States, U.S. postal history and worldwide philatelic history.  With the hiring of Librarian/Archivist Charlotte Cushman the library has moved aggressively to automate its catalog and to digitize parts of its collection. Through an innovative federal grant the library’s catalog is available online as part of Pima County Public Library’s catalog (note: to get to the Postal History Foundation Collection, use the drop down menu on the search bar). It was great to meet and talk to Charlotte at StampShow 2010 in Richmond. More about the library’s special collections in later posts.

Rocky Mountain Philatelic Library

I’m envious of those of you who are located at a reasonable distance from a dedicated philatelic library. Although the services of the American Philatelic Research Library (APRL) are available remotely to both members of the American Philatelic Society and non-members, there’s no substitute for using a library collection in person. One of my sons and his family are located in Longmont, Colorado and as a result I’ve become a member of the Rocky Mountain Philatelic Library (RMPL) in Denver. I try to visit the library whenever I’m in the area, and I have been extremely impressed with their operation.  Although the RMPL is an all volunteer operation, they have benefited greatly from the services of retired librarian Ellengail Beuthel.  The library’s catalog is accessible online through their website which has been recently revamped. The RMPL is also one of the libraries that is participating in the APRL’s online union catalog. Regular membership in the RMPL is $15 but the $25 contributing membership allows you to borrow books from the library including through the mail.  One of the great features of their website is access to the current issue and back issues of  their outstanding newsletter Scribblings.  Recently the library has greatly expanded its space by purchasing and remodeling an adjacent building. If you’re in the Denver area pay a visit to this very welcoming library, and if not, visit them online.

October is Archives Month

October is National Stamp Collecting Month. It is also American Archives Month, and archival institutions around the nation are taking this opportunity to promote their collections. In Wisconsin we’re using the theme Postcard Wisconsin to celebrate Archives Month. Archival records can be valuable resources for the philatelic researcher and we hope to highlight selected archival collections in future posts on this blog. The National Postal Museum Library is home to a number of special archival collections and it is beginning to develop online finding aids for these collections. One of the collections is the archives of the Third Assistant Postmaster General’s Office which contains documents related to the design and production of U.S. regular stamp issues from Scott #1 (1847) to Scott #2532 (1991) as well as ‘back of the book’ issues (airmail, postage dues, postal savings, federal duck stamps, and postal stationery) for roughly the same period. On a personal note, I bring stamps and archives together with my collection of archives and archivists on postage stamps.

Introducing Larry Nix

Larry NixI’m looking forward to being a regular contributor to the new blog of the American Philatelic Research Library (APRL).  The blog format for communicating information is well established in the virtual world of the Internet, and I’m confident that it will be an effective way for the APRL to assist philatelists in the study of a broad range of philatelic topics. I’m a current member of the APRL Board of Trustees, and I write the “Library News” column for the Philatelic Literature Review (PLR). Unfortunately, the news in the “Library News” column is often old news because of the quarterly format of PLR. Currency is one of the major advantages of the blog format.  Part of my enthusiasm for the blog format stems from my experience in maintaining the Library History Buff Blog and and the Wisconsin Library Heritage Center blog and website.  I have an interest in philatelic libraries and museums other than the APRL and this will be a focus of some of my future contributions to the blog.  My primary collecting interest is an area which I call postal librariana.  I have developed several philatelic exhibits featuring libraries and usually enter these exhibits in the Display Division. My interest in libraries stems from a career as a librarian (now retired) which started almost 48 years ago.  As the blog proceeds, I hope my interests in philately and libraries will result in some useful and interesting posts for the readers of this blog.